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Electric Santería: Racial and Sexual Assemblages of Transnational Religion

February 12, 2016
Event flyer

Rutgers University Libraries welcome Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús, associate professor of African religions, Harvard Divinity School, to Alexander Library for the Social and Behavioral Sciences 2016 Dean’s Distinguished Lectureship Keynote in Latino and Caribbean Studies.

Santería is an African-inspired, Cuban diaspora religion long stigmatized as witchcraft and often dismissed as superstition, yet its spirit- and possession-based practices are rapidly winning adherents across the world. Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús introduces the term “copresence” to capture the current transnational experience of Santería, in which racialized and gendered spirits, deities, priests, and religious travelers remake local, national, and political boundaries and reconfigure notions of technology and transnationalism, and draws on eight years of ethnographic research in Havana and Matanzas, Cuba, and in New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Bay area to trace the phenomenon in the lives of Santería practitioners.

Thursday, February 25, 2016
4:00-6:30 p.m.
Scholarly Communications Center, Teleconference Lecture Hall
Fourth floor, Alexander Library