Exhibits: Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series: Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series
2007 Exhibits

"On Either Side"
Berni Searle
2007-2008 Estelle Lebowitz Visiting Artist-in-Residence
October 1, - December 14, 2007

Lecture by Dr. Kellie Jones
"Women / Artists / Africa and Berni Searle"

Wednesday, November 14, 2007, Reception at 6 pm; Lecture at 6:30 pm
Mabel Smith Douglass Room, Douglass Library, 8 Chapel Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901
RSVP by November 7: events@rci.rutgers.edu or (732) 932-7505

Dr. Jones is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. An art historian and curator, her research interests include African American and African Diaspora artists, Latino/a and Latin American Artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory. [More]

Sponsors: Institute for Women and Art, under the auspices of the Office of the Associate Vice President for Academic & Public Partnerships in the Arts & Humanities, in partnership with Rutgers University Libraries and: Associate Alumnae of Douglass College; Brodsky Center and Visiting Artists Series/Visual Arts Department, Mason Gross School of the Arts; Center for African Studies; Department of Art History; Douglass Residential College and the Barbara Voorhees Leadership Initiative; The Feminist Art Project; Institute for Research on Women; SAS Office of International Programs; and the Women's and Gender Studies Department. This event is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

For Press Release please see http://iwa.rutgers.edu/searle.html

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Waiting #1, 2003, Lithograph on watercolour paper, 50.5 x 66 cm
Photo Credit: Gaetane Hermans

Performance: "Rang de Nila (Color Me Blue)"
Thursday, January 31, 2008
4:30 pm- reception to follow
Auditorium, Civic Square Building-MGSA
33 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08901
A collaborative dance event by New Jersey visual artist Siona Benjamin and dancers Pranita Jain, Dina Denis & Nicole Walter. Benjamin, a painter originally from Bombay, now living in the U.S., reflects upon her background of being brought up Jewish in a predominately Hindu and Muslim India in her work. An artists' discussion and reception follow the program.

Sponsored by the Institute for Women & Art (IWA) in partnership with Rutgers University Libraries. The IWA operates under the auspices of the Associate Vice President for Academic & Public Partnerships in the Arts & Humanities, Rutgers University. Co-sponsors include: Associate Alumni of Douglass College; Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions/ 0Mason Gross School of the Arts; Department of Art History; The Feminist Art Project, Institute for Research on Women; SAS Office of International Programs; the Women's and Gender Studies Department, all at Rutgers University.

These events are made possible by funding from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/ Department of State, a partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Maria and Henry Leon Memorial Fund. These exhibitions and programs complement campus-wide related events organized by the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum and the South Asian Research Initiative at Rutgers (SARI). In particular, "New Narratives" an exhibition which opens at the Zimmerli Museum in April 2008.

Panel Discussion:
"Passage to New Jersey: Women Artists of the South Asian Diaspora in Our Midst"
Thursday, March 6, 2008 at 4:30 pm
Mabel Smith Douglass Room, Douglass Library
8 Chapel Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901
RSVP: events@rci.rutgers.edu
Panel discussion moderated by V. G. Julie Rajan of the Women & Gender Studies Department, Rutgers University, featuring artists Siona Benjamin, Anuradha Das, with curators and scholars.

Sponsored by the Institute for Women & Art (IWA) in partnership with Rutgers University Libraries. The IWA operates under the auspices of the Associate Vice President for Academic & Public Partnerships in the Arts & Humanities, Rutgers University. Co-sponsors include: Associate Alumni of Douglass College; Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions/ 0Mason Gross School of the Arts; Department of Art History; The Feminist Art Project, Institute for Research on Women; SAS Office of International Programs; the Women's and Gender Studies Department, all at Rutgers University.

These events are made possible by funding from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/ Department of State, a partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Maria and Henry Leon Memorial Fund. These exhibitions and programs complement campus-wide related events organized by the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum and the South Asian Research Initiative at Rutgers (SARI). In particular, "New Narratives" an exhibition which opens at the Zimmerli Museum in April 2008.

Exhibition: "Brenda Goodman: Self-Portraits 2003 - 2007"
April 23 - August 3, 2007

Lecture by Brenda Goodman
Monday, April 23, 2007 - 4:00 p.m
Mabel Smith Douglass Library Galleries
Mabel Smith Douglass Library
Douglass Campus

The work of New York painter Brenda Goodman is featured in "Brenda Goodman: Self-Portraits 2003 – 2007," opening Monday, April 23, 2007, at the Mabel Smith Douglass Library Galleries and continuing through August 3, 2007. Goodman will give a talk in the exhibition galleries on Monday, April 23 at 4 p.m., followed by a public reception in her honor. This event is free of charge and the public is invited. Exhibition hours for the show are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays and weekends by appointment. Douglass Library is located on Rutgers Douglass Campus, 8 Chapel Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901.

Brenda Goodman grew up in Detroit, Michigan, where she studied art at the College for Creative Studies, a traditional art school where, as Goodman says, "you drew a still life for six months before you could actually start painting." From art magazines, Goodman began to learn about the burgeoning contemporary art world, and in the early 1970s, she joined Cass Corridor, a group of progressive artists who had studios in a large building in inner-city Detroit. In 1974, Gertrude Kasle, the leading gallery in Detroit, took on Goodman as one of its artists. Through Kasle, Goodman met Marcia Tucker, founding director of New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art.

After moving to Manhattan in 1976, Goodman quickly became well known and was included in the Whitney Biennial of 1979. She has shown her painting in many cities over the years including Edward Thorp and Cavin-Morris in New York, Revolution in Detroit and the Nielsen Gallery in Boston. Goodman’s paintings and drawings are in the permanent collections of Agnes Gund; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Detroit Institute of Arts; and the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts, among others.

In 1993, Goodman became dissatisfied with the abstract expressionist mode in which she had painted until then. She says that she "had a desire to paint myself much more naturalistically; I felt it was important not to have a veil between me and my feelings, between me and the viewer. I wanted the work to be open. So much contemporary painting is not open. . . you can't penetrate it. You have no clue who the artist is, or why they're even doing what they're doing. Which is fine – I mean you can paint for different reasons and come from different places. But for me, it's always been crucial that I reveal myself, share my journey."

In the resulting paintings and drawing, the surfaces – whether paint, graphite, or colored pencil – become skin, revealing the wear and tear of a lifetime. The body is simultaneously vulnerable and commanding. As such, Goodman's self-portraits visually embody the contemporary discussion on the naked female figure as the intersection of the physicality of the body and social/political interpretation.

On June 14, 2007, a second exhibition featuring Goodman's work will open at the Mason Gross School of the Arts Galleries at 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick. "Eccentric Bodies" was inspired by seeing Goodman’s work. The exhibition includes six additional artists whose subject matter is the female form: Harriet Casdin-Silver, Bailey Doogan, Orlan, Ernestine Ruben, Berni Searle, and Linda Stein. "Eccentric Bodies" will remain on view through Friday, August 3.

Both exhibitions are under the auspices of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series, a joint program of the Rutgers University Libraries and the Rutgers Institute for Women and Art. Co-sponsor is the Brodsky Center at the Mason Gross School of the Arts. The Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series, now in its 36th year, is the oldest continuing venue for showing both established and emerging women artists. The shows’ curators are Judith K. Brodsky, professor emerita, Department of Visual Arts and Founding Director, the Brodsky Center (formerly the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper), and Dr. Ferris Olin, head, the Margery Somers Foster Center, Rutgers University Libraries. Brodsky and Olin are co-directors of the Rutgers Institute for Women and Art. The exhibitions are also part of The Feminist Art Project, a national program, headquartered at Rutgers' Institute for Women and Art, celebrating the aesthetic, intellectual and political impact of women on the visual arts, art history, and art practice, past, present, and future.

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Brenda Goodman, "Self Portrait 61," 2007,
52 x 48 inches; oil on wood

"Eccentric Bodies"
June 14 - August 3, 2007

Eccentric Bodies, a group exhibition that explores new visions of the female nude, opens at the Mason Gross School of the Arts Galleries on June 14, 2007, with a public opening reception in honor of the artists from 5 to 7 p.m. The show will remain on view through August 3, 2007.

Eccentric Bodies includes the work of seven women artists who are creating a new "gaze" directed towards the female nude. These artists explore the intersection of life's imprint on the site of women's bodies. Their work contradicts the conventional "male gaze" of Western art since the Renaissance in which the nude is represented as sexually passive and available; the contemporary gaze of artists like John Currin and Lisa Yuskavage, who subvert this traditional "male gaze" through exaggeration and distortion; and the gaze of the feminist artists of the 1970s who were concerned primarily with gender. The Eccentric Bodies artists are concerned with such issues as the aging body and the body as the bearer of cultural and ethnic identity. A distinguishing characteristic of the group show is that all works are on a heroic scale.

The show's seven featured artists themselves represent a range of geography, age, and medium. They are Harriet Casdin-Silver, photographer, Boston, Massachusetts; Bailey Doogan, painter, Tucson, Arizona; Brenda Goodman, painter, New York; Orlan, performance and video artist, Paris, France; Ernestine Ruben, photographer, Princeton, New Jersey; Berni Searle, performance and video artist, Johannesburg, South Africa; and Linda Stein, sculptor, New York.

The Mason Gross School of the Arts Galleries are located at 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. The exhibition is curated by Judith K. Brodsky and Ferris Olin, and sponsored by the Institute for Women and Art, the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series, and the Brodsky Center, all at Rutgers University.

Harriet Casdin-Silver, now in her 80s, in her desire to eliminate the distance between the photograph of the body and its viewer uses holography to animate her images. She focuses on how women's identity literally shifts as the body experiences changes such as weight gain, muscle loss, and aging throughout a lifetime.

Bailey Doogan is a figurative painter with an elegantly detailed style. The beauty of her painted surfaces creates a powerful tension when paired with the distorted bodies that are her subjects. Like 21st-century versions of Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel figures of the Last Judgement, one feels that they inhabit the hell of life itself, making their way through sheer dint of will.

Brenda Goodman moved from Detroit to New York in 1976 and quickly became well-known in the New York art world. She was included in the Whitney Biennial and has shown through important New York galleries like Cavin-Morris and Edward Thorp. Goodman worked in an abstract expressionist mode for many years, but since 2003 she has moved to self-portraiture, using images of her own nude body for statements about the impact of aging and imminent death. The marks of her brush and palette knife and the build up of the paint become scratches, scars, wrinkles, and even open wounds on the body.

The French artist, Orlan, has explored the social construct of "woman" through her own body. She uses the procedures of plastic surgery to make "carnal art." She first transformed her face to question the stereotypes of beauty in European and American culture. In recent years, she has been using surgery to blur racial and ethnic distinctions, giving herself a "Mayan nose," for instance, or a longer neck like the stretched necks considered beautiful by some African cultures. The surgeries are documented on videos that have been widely distributed.

It takes some time before viewers know what they are looking at when they first see Ernestine Ruben's photographs of the body. Their mysterious fragmentation, the way in which they become all-encompassing landscape yet retain the intimacy of the body parts they depict, can be disorientating. Ruben's work has been widely shown, particularly in Europe; it is in the permanent collections of museums worldwide.

Berni Searle, a performance and video artist from Johannesburg, South Africa, is included in the Global Feminisms exhibition at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center of Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum. Using her own body as subject and point of departure, Searle comments on the intersection of race and gender in South Africa, particularly for mixed race "coloureds."

Linda Stein's sculptures are bronze and paper female heroic figures. She draws comparisons to the comics of Wonder Woman and the anime of Princess Mononoke. The British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen interviewed Stein in his 2006 film Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan under the deception that her participation would help Third World women. At first Stein responded seriously until she recognized the joke and stormed off the set. Stein has been sought after as "the only person who stood up to Borat." Stein was recently awarded a commission for three bronze sculptures for the outdoor "Walk of the Heroines" at Portland State University, Oregon. In recent work, Stein has been pairing the sculptures with shadow figures on the wall itself. One of these shadow figures is Wonder Woman. Another is her payback to Sacha Baron Cohen-a nude image of Cohen with a very small phallus. An exhibition of Stein's work is currently traveling on the East Coast.

For more information contact Nicole Plett, 732/932-9407 ext. 27 or write nplett@rci.rutgers.edu.

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Ernestine Ruben, "Zurich Invitation," 2007, digital photograph, 48 x 32 inches.


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Berni Searle, "Still," 2001, an installation of 8 digital photographs, each 46 x 46 inches.

"Favorite Elements: Works by Orlan"
March 8 - April 13, 2007
This is My Body, This is My Software.
Lecture by Orlan
Wednesday, March 21 - 4:30 pm
Mabel Smith Douglass Library
Women's and Gender Studies Research Room
Douglass Campus


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Orlan, "African Self-Hybridization: Ndebele Giraffe Woman of Ngumi Stock, Zimbabwe, with Euro-Parisian Woman." 2002. Digital photograph on color photographic paper. Collection of the Artist.
  

Photographic works and video documentation of performances by the French artist Orlan are on view in the Mabel Smith Douglass Library Galleries, Douglass College Campus-Rutgers/New Brunswick from March 8 through April 13.

The artist will give a free, public presentation at the Douglass Library on Wednesday, March 21, beginning at 4:30 pm. The title of her talk is "This is My Body, This is My Software."

Orlan is internationally known for her 1990s transformative performances that question standards of beauty imposed on women, such as those idealized in iconic art historical depictions of Venus, Psyche and the Mona Lisa. More recent work on view also in the galleries renders her continuing investigation of transfiguration through photographic self-portraits, Self-Hybridizations, inspired by pre-Columbian, African and Native American cultures. This exhibition is a rare chance to see an overview of her oeuvre.

Orlan's work can also currently be seen in two New York-metropolitan area group shows: at the Robeson Gallery, Rutgers/Newark campus in Imago: The Drama of Self-Portraiture in Recent Photography and at Manhattan's Chelsea Museum's Dangerous Beauty exhibition. She is a visiting scholar at The Getty Research Center in Los Angeles during the 2006-2007 academic year.

The exhibition and lecture have been organized for the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series by Professor Emeritus Judith K. Brodsky and Dr. Ferris Olin, Co-Directors of the Institute for Women and Art at Rutgers. The Institute administers the series in collaboration with the Rutgers University Libraries. Co-sponsors of these events are the Art History Department, Associate Alumnae of Douglass College, Brodsky Center at the Mason Gross School of the Arts, Institute for Women and Art, Institute for Research on Women, Institute for Women's Leadership, Margery Somers Foster Center of the Rutgers University Libraries, Women's and Gender Studies Department, all at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick. The Feminist Art Project, a collaborative national initiative celebrating the Feminist Art Movement and the aesthetic, intellectual and political impact of women on the visual arts, art history, and art practice, past and present, is also a sponsor.

  
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Orlan, "American Indian Self-Hybridization No. 9: Painting Portrait of Wá-Hón-Ga-Shee, No Fool, A great Fop, with Orlan’s Photographic Portrait." 2005. Digital Photograph. Collection of the Artist.