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Women's History Sources: A Guide

Janet Hobhouse papers (image by John Timbers)
Janet Hobhouse
Women's History Sources: A Guide
Manuscripts: H - K

Entries: A - B | C - D | E - G | H   I   J   K | L - M | N - O | P - R | S - T | U - Z | University Records
Indexes: Subjects and Titles | Personal and Corporate Names | Place Names



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HACKETT, Hazel B. (Hazel Beaty), 1892-
Papers, 1931-1980 (bulk 1931-1961).
ca. 1 cubic ft.
Owner and manager of Arlington Cemetery, Pennsauken, N.J.; born Hazel Beaty; married James L. Hackett (d. 1938); served as president, 1934-1936, of the Soroptimist Club based in Camden, N.J.; also served as director, North Atlantic Region, 1936-1938, and as president, 1946-1948, of the American Federation of Soroptimist Clubs; died in 1995.
Speeches, scrapbooks and other papers which chiefly pertain to Hackett's activities at the local, regional and national levels of the American Federation of Soroptimist Clubs. Included is an August 1947 letter from Eleanor Roosevelt concerning a meeting to discuss ongoing educational efforts on the United Nations that were being conducted nationally within various women's organizations.

HAHM, Elmira H.
Papers, 1892.
2 items (1 envelope).
License to practice as a midwife in N.J. and a printed circular containing the text of "An act to regulate the practice of midwifery in the State of New Jersey," which was approved March 28th, 1892.

HAINES, Jane.
Commonplace book, 1848-1872.
1 v.
Resident of Rancocas, N.J.
Volume containing verse and prose copied from various authors, most of whom are identified.

HAINES FAMILY.
Papers, 1908-1956 (bulk 1910-1918).
.5 cubic ft. (2 boxes).
In part, photocopies of discarded original newspaper clippings.
Residents of Newark, N.J.; family members included Julia Moore (Ross) Haines (1844-1931) and her daughters Florence L. Haines (1869-1955), Alice B. Haines (1871-1946) and Margaret D. Haines (1884-1966).
Letters received by various family members, chiefly Alice B. Haines (from 1908, 1918 and 1938) and Margaret D. Haines (from 1909 to 1956 with gaps), together with several press clippings.
Most of the letters received by Alice B. Haines date from her 1908 trip to Europe. These letters were written to her by her mother Julia M. Haines and by her sister Florence L. Haines.
Most of the letters received by Margaret D. Haines were written to her by two suitors, Alfred de Andrade and Alex B. Dickerson. Andrade's letters, 1909-1911 and undated, were often written from British Guiana, where he was engaged in business. Dickerson's letters, 1915 and November 1917-August 1918, were written primarily while serving in the U.S. Army, at first in the U.S. and later in Europe with the American Expeditionary Force.
Finding aid available.

HALSEY, Ezra.
School attendance record, 1823 Apr.-1824 Aug.
1 item (1 folder).
Attendance record of girls and boys at an unidentified school conducted by Halsey in Mine Hill, N.J. Laid in the attendance record is a related receipt.

HARDENBERGH FAMILY.
Papers, 1749-1927.
.4 cubic ft. (10 folders).
Residents of New Brunswick, N.J.
Family papers, including letters received and other papers, 1818-1867, of Catherine Low Hardenbergh (1794-1873), a diary of Ann Maria Hardenbergh (1828-1860) and a diary of Catherine Low Hardenbergh (1852-1902).
The school journal kept in 1840 and 1841 by Ann Maria ("Nancy") Hardenbergh, daughter of attorney Cornelius L. Hardenbergh (1790-1860), seems to have been part of a school assignment while she was a student at Raritan Seminary in Perth Amboy, N.J.; it also contains school compositions.
The diary, Jan. 1, 1869-May 31, 1870, kept by Catherine Low Hardenbergh (1852-1902), teenage daughter of real estate and insurance broker Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh (1824-1892), contains information about her daily life, sewing, visits, a few household chores, reading, family matters and Second Reformed Church activities.

HARGER, Eone.
Papers, 1956-1982.
5 cubic ft. (5 cartons).
Director of the N.J. Division on Aging (known in earlier years as the Division of Aging).
Correspondence, speeches, notes, reports and subject files relating to the Division on Aging. Also papers relating to the 1971 and 1981 White House Conferences on Aging, the Advisory Council of the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging and the Retired Senior Volunteer Program.
Container list available.
Advance notice required to consult this collection.

HAYS, Kattie J.
Commonplace book, 1845-1860.
1 v.
Resident of Burlington, N.J.
Volume of original verse relating to family and friends.

HENDERSON, Alfred R.
Papers, 1905-1951.
2 folders.
Draftsman and civil engineer; employed by Rutgers University during the 1930s; beneficiary of the estate of Mabel Smith Douglass.
Papers, among which are correspondence and other documents pertaining to the estate of Mabel Smith Douglass, the first dean of the New Jersey College for Women (now Douglass College), Rutgers University.

HERESIES COLLECTIVE, inc.
Records, 1976-1995.
18 cubic ft. (18 cartons).
Organized and incorporated in 1976 with headquarters in New York City; composed of a fluctuating core membership (the Collective, all of whom were also board members) consisting of up to two dozen feminists from a variety of disciplines (such as painters, sculptors, writers, anthropologists, performance artists, critics, art historians and filmmakers) whose primary purpose was to foster the publication of a journal (with each number devoted to a single theme relating to art and politics from a feminist perspective) for which the assembled contributors, editors and production staff of each issue were essentially a different group of women, all or most of whom were not members of the Collective; in its twenty-seven journal issues, treated subjects such as feminism and ecology, Third World women, women and music, food as a feminist issue, the art of education and lesbian art and artists; received funding from contributions, profits from benefit events (e.g., art shows selling donated works), granting agencies (e.g., the New York State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts) and journal sales and subscriptions; except for a more ambitious production schedule in its earlier years, created on average one journal issue annually (and held an event after the publication of each to stimulate topical discussions and receive feedback); employed a small administrative staff to assist in running its office and in handling some aspects of the journal's production; added an advisory board (consisting of persons who were not members of the Collective) to its administrative structure in 1984; disbanded for financial reasons in 1995.
Articles of incorporation, by-laws, minutes of meetings, fundraising and publicity files, administrative files, journal production and sales files and a complete set of the journal Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics.
Container list available.
Advance notice required to consult this collection.

HEROY, Anne Pluymert, 1855-1939.
Travel journals, 1912-1926.
4 v.
Native of Newark, N.J.; became totally deaf before the age of twenty, but became adept at lipreading and was able to communicate despite her disability; resided in New York City in 1912 (with sisters and her widowed mother); subsequently lived (in 1922) with a younger sister; died at her home in East Orange, N.J.
Travel journals recording European trips made in 1912, 1922 and 1926. During her travels, Heroy visited Italy, Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, England, Monaco and France. Her journals describe social contacts with other travelers, sight-seeing, shopping and visits to museums, historic sites and antiquities.

HIGHLAND PARK REFORMED CHURCH (N.J.). CIRCLE A.
Records, 1932-1939.
1 v. (1 envelope).
Women's group dedicated in part to the making of garments for use in relief work conducted by missionaries of the Reformed Church in America.
Minutes, April 1932-October 1939; attendance record, April 1935-March 1938; list of "Sewing and Donations," 1935-1938; and membership list. Also included are undated minutes (apparently covering a three-year span) and miscellaneous poems.

HILLSIDE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WOMEN.
Records, 1956-[1994?].
2 cubic ft.
Organized and chartered in 1956 as the Hillside Business and Professional Women's Club; incorporated in 1961; conducted a varied program of activities, including granting scholarships for senior high school girls planning to study for a professional or business career, conducting a series of programs to help women improve themselves in their chosen careers and participating in community-wide projects; began using the name Hillside Business and Professional Women about 1987.
Minutes, correspondence, yearbooks, programs for annual banquets, scrapbooks (consisting chiefly of press clippings and photographs) and scrapbook material, certificates and resolutions and a guest book.

HOBART, Elizabeth Wills Rutter, 1839-1918.
Diary, 1863 Jan. 1-July 30.
Partial microfilm reel: negative.
Resident of Pottstown, Pennsylvania; born Elizabeth Wills Rutter, the daughter of Charles Rutter.
Diary containing details about Hobart's daily life, family, social visits, church and such Civil War activities as soldiers' aid meetings.

HOBHOUSE, Janet, 1948-
Papers, [ca. 1885]-1991 (bulk 1958-1991).
ca. 15 cubic ft.
Author and art critic; born in New York City as Jean Konradin Hobhouse in 1948; raised in New York City; was graduated from Spence School in 1964; moved to England (where her father lived); attended school in Somerset, 1964-1966; was graduated from Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University, in 1969 and then moved to London; subsequently began writing about art for magazines on a freelance basis and worked successively for two publishing houses; in 1974 married journalist and author Nicholas Fraser (b. 1948), from whom she was divorced in 1983 after a two-year period of separation; wrote Everybody Who Was Anybody: A Biography of Gertrude Stein (1975) which received a Pulitzer Prize nomination; moved to New York City in 1976, where she lived most of the time thereafter; subsequently wrote three critically acclaimed novels: Nellie without Hugo (1982), Dancing in the Dark (1983) and November (1986), the latter of which received a nomination for Britain's Booker Prize; worked as an art critic for Newsweek, 1987-1988; wrote The Bride Stripped Bare: The Artist and the Female Nude in the 20th Century (1988); received foundation awards and spent time at several arts colonies; died of cancer in New York City in January 1991; final novel, the autobiographical The Furies, appeared posthumously in 1993.
Personal correspondence; editorial correspondence, 1974-1990, chiefly with magazine editors, book editors and literary agents; appointment books, 1974-1991 (with gaps); diaries, 1958 and 1978, the latter of which is more of a memo book; manuscripts of writings, 1982-1990; publications, 1982-1990, consisting of essays and reviews which appeared in various magazines; book reviews, 1977-1988, pertaining to Hobhouse's books; photographs, [ca. 1960]-1989; and other papers, 1953-1990, among which are school papers. Also papers of Hobhouse's mother Frances (Liedloff) Hobhouse (1925-1979), [ca. 1885]-1979; of her husband Nicholas Fraser, 1970-1979; and of her great aunt Frances Bolton, 1964-1983. Additional papers present consist of miscellaneous letters received by other relatives and friends.
The papers of Frances Hobhouse, a sculptor who lived in New York City, include letters received, 1955-1979, chiefly from family members (including daughter Janet Hobhouse while in England); diaries, 1971-1979, documenting a period of deepening depression that ended in suicide; photographs, [ca. 1885]-1979; and personal miscellany, 1958-1976.
Restricted in part.
Finding aid available.

HOUSMAN, Ida E. (Ida Emily)
Papers, 1947-1964.
3 items (1 envelope).
Teacher and activist; ran for Hoboken, N.J., city commissioner in 1951.
Typescript article concerning politics in Hoboken and information on pension benefits for teachers in N.J. The typescript, entitled "The Hoboken Political Arena," incorporates relevant photographs, newspaper clippings and campaign literature.

HOWELL FAMILY.
Papers, ca. 1880-1964.
ca. 1.9 cubic ft. (5 boxes, 1 envelope, 7 folders and 1 oversize folder).
Family, of northern N.J. and New York City, consisting of Eliza Dunham Howell (1834-1916), her brother Martin A. Howell, Jr. (1832-1905), his spouse Abbie Lucetta (Stout) Howell (1835-1890), their son Wilson S. Howell (1855-1943), the latter's second wife Bertha Lee (Wilson) Howell (1862-1902) and at least one other relative.
Among the family papers are diaries, 1894 and 1906, and correspondence of Eliza Howell. Her diaries, kept while she lived in New York City, contain comments on stocks and other investments, as well as information about a 1906 European trip. Also present are letters, 1858-1864, received by Abbie Howell and a diary, 1899-1902, kept jointly by Bertha Howell and her husband while the couple apparently lived somewhere in northern N.J.

HULSIZER, Mary Burr, b. 1889.
Papers, 1797-1973.
.2 cubic ft. (1 box).
War letters and associated papers present only as photocopies.
Mary B. Hulsizer: Supervisor of health and nursing in the Newark, N.J., public school system, 1928-1955.
Marjorie Hulsizer Copher: born Edith Marjorie Hulsizer, but used the name Marjorie; served with Harvard U.S. Army Base Hospital No. 5, British Expeditionary Force, May 1917-December 1918, and then with Base Hospital No. 57, American Expeditionary Force, into 1919; married Dr. Glover H. Copher (d. 1970) ca. 1925; memorialized by the American Dietetic Association's Marjorie Hulsizer Copher Award.
Letters received, 1917-1919, from her sister Marjorie Copher (1891-1935), a dietician in France during World War I, and associated papers, [1910?]-1973; European travel journal, 1957; family correspondence, 1797-1849, primarily of the Burr and Hill families; and genealogical materials on the Burr, Hill and related families.
The travel journal, April 9-December 8, 1957, describes sight-seeing, shopping and social contacts during a trip made by Hulsizer through England, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, France, Spain and five other countries.
Additional Marjorie Copher letters written during World War I (or perhaps the originals of those described here?) are available in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress.

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JARNAGIN, Emily L. Murrell.
Diary, 1850 Apr. 1-July 10.
1 item (17 p. reproducing 144 p.).
Electrostatic reproduction of a manuscript copy.
Born Emily L. Murrell; married Milton Preston Jarnagin in 1852.
Diary of a visit made (probably as a teenager) to relatives and friends in the Cherokee Nation in what is now northeastern Oklahoma. The diary begins with a ten-day journey from the diarist's home in Mississippi to the farm of her uncle Maj. George Michael Murrell and his spouse Minerva Ross (a Cherokee) which was located near Tahlequah. The writer was not herself a Cherokee, but the social life, local trips and visits that she describes primarily concern members and affiliates of the Cherokee Nation. Some of the persons visited were slaveholders and one of the diarist's traveling companions may have been a slave.

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF OAKLAND (Oakland, N.J.). SISTERHOOD.
Records, 1958-1982.
1.33 cubic ft. (4 boxes and 1 folder).
Constitution and by-laws, 1959, 1966, 1980 and undated; minutes, April 1958-June 1979, of membership meetings; minutes, May 1958-May 1979, of board meetings; membership lists, 1962/63 and 1966/67; general files, 1958-1982, including files relating to publicity and annual bazaars; and photographs, 1970 and 1974-1975.
Forms part of a larger collection of the Center's records.

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KIDDER, Harriette Smith, 1816-1915.
Papers, 1836-1902.
2 v.
Teacher and principal at Worthington Female Seminary, a Methodist school in Ohio; married the Rev. Daniel P. Kidder (1815-1891) in 1842 as his second wife; raised five children (three of her own and two from her husband's former marriage); lived in New York City, 1844-1846, and Newark, N.J., 1846-1856, while her husband worked as an editor of Methodist Sunday school publications; lived in Evanston, Illinois, 1856-1871, when her husband taught at Garrett Biblical Institute, and in Madison, N.J., 1871-1881, when he taught at Drew Theological Seminary; later lived again in New York City, 1882-1887, and Evanston, 1887-1899; thereafter resided in Brooklyn, New York (by then a part of New York City), and Ocean Grove, N.J.
Diary, 1844-1859, 1871-1874 and 1891-1902 (with occasional entries from intervening years), and an autograph album, 1836-1838. The diary contains detailed retrospective narratives, family sketches and reminiscences, as well as information about Kidder's involvement in Methodism as a minister's wife and independently; her theological, moral and social concerns; her interest in temperance; and accounts of travel with her husband in the U.S. and, in 1852-1853, Europe. The diaries also contain copies of a few letters and several clippings.
Publication: Harrison, Victoria G., "Little Matters and a Great Mission: The Life and Diary of Harriette Smith Kidder," Journal of the Rutgers University Libraries, XLVI (1984): 58-66.
In: Daniel P. Kidder Papers.

KIRKPATRICK, Jane Bayard, 1772-1851.
Papers, 1788-1834 (bulk 1823-1834).
1 v. and 2 folders.
Resident of New Brunswick, N.J.; born Jane Bayard; married New Brunswick attorney Andrew Kirkpatrick (1756-1831) who was a N.J. Supreme Court justice, a trustee of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) and president of Princeton Theological Seminary.
Diary, January 1, 1824-July 11, 1834, and letters received, 1788, 1823 and 1829, accompanied by a letter received by her spouse in 1801. The diary details domestic and social activities, local events and news about her children, friends and relatives.

KITE, Elizabeth Sarah, 1864-1954.
Papers, 1840-1962.
1.93 cubic ft. (5 boxes).
Teacher, social scientist, historian and archivist; born in Philadelphia of Quaker parents; worked as a teacher, interrupted by periods of advanced study in Europe; converted to Roman Catholicism in 1906; worked at the Vineland Training School for Mental Defectives, 1909-1918, and conducted research there (and later under the auspices of the New Jersey Commissioner of Charities and Corrections) pertaining to residents of the Pine Barrens; translated The Intelligence of the Feeble-Minded by Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon (translation published 1916); also researched various historical topics, especially the influence of French participation during the American Revolution; served as archivist of the American Catholic Historical Society in Philadelphia, 1932-1949; died in Wilmington, Delaware. Form of name used: Elizabeth S. Kite.
Correspondence, an unpublished autobiography, articles and other writings, notes, genealogical material, photographs and clippings. The papers include materials from Kite's research and writings on a supposed genetic basis for mental degeneracy and feeblemindedness. Groups represented in the papers include the residents of the Pine Barrens in southern N.J. and the Ramapo Mountain People of New York State and northern N.J.

KNOLL, Margaret K. Spangler.
Scrapbook, 1920-1975 (bulk 1946-1965).
1 v.
Assistant librarian at Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania; became acquainted with Theodore Roethke and Vance Packard while each was employed at the University, where she also met library employee Katharine Stokes, a lifelong friend of Roethke, and William Werner, who was at one time Knoll's professor.
Scrapbook containing letters and postcards received from Theodore Roethke by Knoll (7 items : 1946-1950), Katharine Stokes (1 item : 1939) and William Werner (1 item : 1950), together with letters about Roethke written by Katharine Stokes, both to Knoll (6 items : 1951-1965 and undated) and to Mr. and Mrs. William Werner (1 item : 1963). Related materials present are a typescript Roethke poem ("The reminder" with a correction in pen by the author), an undated manuscript by Katharine Stokes (describing Roethke's departure for Chicago by train) and a letter and postcard from June Roethke (the poet's sister) to Knoll (2 items : 1964 and 1972?). Completing the contents of the scrapbook are a 1964 letter from Vance Packard to Knoll, a 1961 letter from John O'Hara to William Werner and three letters, 1920, 1926 and undated, written by Edna St. Vincent Millay.

KNOX, Aletta V. (Aletta Van Doren), 1816-1852.
Papers, 1828-[ca. 1833].
4 v.
Born Aletta Veghte; married the Rev. John P. Knox (1811-1882), a Reformed Dutch and Presbyterian clergyman.
Diary, May 12, 1828-February 19, 1830 and January 22, 1831; composition book, 1828-1830; and commonplace book, ca. 1831-ca. 1833. The diary contains details about Knox's life at Van Doren Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, New York, and vacation visits to her home on a farm at Raritan, N.J.
In: John P. Knox Papers.

KOVÀCS, Magdelene.
Record of births attended ["birth report memoranda"], 1917-1929.
.16 cubic ft. (1 box).
Bulk arranged chronologically, followed by undated items.
Midwife, of New Brunswick, N.J.; possessed a predominantly Hungarian clientele; married Stephen Kovàcs.
Twenty-five small, bound booklets of accomplished printed forms, recording approximately 450 births, accompanied by one of Kovàcs' business cards. Except for the name of the attendant (herself or, rarely, a Mrs. Schumaker) and the place of residence (identical with the place of birth), Kovàcs normally completed these forms in their entirety. Information recorded consists of the chilld(ren)'s name(s), sex and race (listed as "color"); the place of birth (usually a street address); the father's occupation (frequently "labor," but not requested on later forms); the parents' names (including the mother's birth name); the parents' ages and places of birth (usually a foreign country, but not filled in for some mothers); and the total number of children from the marriage (including the number still living). Concluding each form is the "date of report" for a corresponding birth certificate which has been detached and filed with the New Jersey Bureau of Vital Statistics.
In addition to New Brunswick births, Kovàcs sometimes attended births in outlying communities in Middlesex and Somerset Counties. Other than Hungary, the principal countries of origin listed on the forms include Poland, America (more so in later years) and Russia; approximately ten other European countries are also cited occasionally. At least one posthumus birth is recorded, as are several stillbirths. In addition, approximately ten African-American births are recorded; instead of "America," these entries sometimes list a southern state as the parents' birthplace.
Attribution of the birth records to Kovàcs is based on the presence of her business card in the collection.

KRATTIGER, Eleanor Egg, 1909-
Scrapbooks, 1912-1989 (bulk 1924-1935).
3 v. and 1 oversize folder.
Several press clippings available only as photocopies.
Athlete and dance instructor, of northern N.J.; worked as a child acrobat in her parents' vaudeville act; lived in Paterson, N.J., year round after her parents gave up touring when she was eight years old; began her athletic exploits while enrolled in the public schools; competed with some success (eventually winning over 250 medals and trophies) in local, regional and national Amateur Athletic Union competitions through her affiliation with the Paterson Girls' Recreation Association and the Duffy League; was embraced by the Paterson community which celebrated her accomplishments and sometimes raised money to support her travel (and that of teammates) to out-of-state meets; set the women's outdoor broad jump record in 1927; injured her ankle in 1928 and did not compete for the U.S. Olympic team; defeated well-known defending champion Stella Walsh in the 100 yard dash at a national meet held in Jersey City in 1931 and was then honored by the Paterson community with a testimonial dinner and the creation of a commemorative plaque; reinjured her ankle, which limited her subsequent success, and retired from competition in the early 1930s; coached a local girls' track club for several years; married Charles Krattiger (1906-1984) in 1935; taught dance for four decades at various studios, including her own, both before and after she and her family moved to West Milford, N.J., in 1945; took up oil painting in the 1960s or early 1970s; moved to Florida in 1979.
Scrapbooks, 1912(1924)-(1935)1967, pertaining to Krattiger's career as a track and field athlete (and, to a lesser extent, other women athletes with whom she competed) and several related unmounted items (press clippings, black-and-white photographs and a poster). The scrapbooks consist mostly of press clippings (including coverage of Krattiger's induction into the Greater Paterson "Sports Hall of Fame" in 1967), although several black-and-white photographs, handwritten season summaries, letters, certificates and an event program are also present.

KRIENDLER, I. Robert (Irving Robert), 1914-1974, collector.
I. Robert Kriendler collection, 1923-1973 (bulk 1934-1956).
8.75 cubic ft. (23 boxes).
Collection of literary manuscripts of twentieth century fiction and nonfiction. Women authors represented are: Faith Baldwin (1 item), Viņa Delmar (1 item), Edna Ferber (2 items), Fannie Ferber Fox (1 item), Emily Hahn (3 items), Lillian Hellman (1 item), Osa Johnson (1 item), Alva Johnston (3 items), Louise Kennedy Mabie (1 item) and Mary Roberts Rinehart (1 item).
Container list available.