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"Artists on The Edge"
Exhibit Remembers Edgy, Creative Time For Women Artists at Rutgers

Eleven artists who learned as Rutgers students that anything might be used to make art, and who went on to demonstrate as much in their own careers, will exhibit selected works at the Mabel Smith Douglass Library, on the Douglass College campus, from March 9 to June 6.

Their professors included such icons of the avant garde as Roy Lichtenstein, one of the original Pop Artists; Allan Kaprow, the creator of the "happening"; Robert Watts, George Segal, Geoffrey Hendricks, John Goodyear and others.

The exhibition, titled "Artists on the Edge," is part of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series.

The artists, 10 women and a man, all studied on the Douglass College campus between 1959 and 1972. They were influenced by the Fluxus movement, which challenged the conventional definition of art, embraced social and political activism, and celebrated anarchistic change. They created art from such materials as scavenged posters, newspapers, clothing or the artists' own bodies.

Twenty-four works have been selected for the exhibition. Some date from the artists' student days; others are quite recent. They include painting, sculpture, photography and video, and include such objects as a bra and a hanger.

The professors, still young themselves, and still forming themselves as artists, took their students with them on their artistic journeys. They often exhibited in New York City galleries, and took pains to expose their students to those galleries and the city's museums.

Several of the artists received their undergraduate education at Douglass College, and others took part in the Rutgers master of fine arts program, which was located at Douglass. Alice Aycock, DC '68 and an eminent sculptor, has said that Douglass "was the best piece of luck that ever, ever happened. I will always say that."

The artists whose work will be shown in the exhibition are Aycock, Loretta Dunkelman, Frances Kuehn, Linda Lindroth, Marion Munk, Rita Myers, Mimi Smith, Joan Snyder, Keith Sonnier, Ann Tsubota and Jackie Winsor.

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Loretta Dunkelman. Untitled. 1997. Oil on linen. 12" x 12"
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Mimi Smith. Recycle Coat. 1965. Plastic bags, bottle caps and hanger. 50" x 34".
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Linda Lindroth. Redshift. 2002. Mixed media installation (Still photographs and video monitor with footage). 11" x 13.5" plus VCR
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Rita Myers. Resurrection Body. 1993. Video installation.
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Linda Tsubota. Toaster. Stoneware. 12.5" x 9" x 5"
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Frances Kuehn. Turning the Stone. 2003. Acrylic on Canvas. 56" x 36.5"
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Jackie Winsor. Rope Trick. Rope and metal rod. 74" x 9" (diameter) Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York.
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Marion Munk. Untitled. 2002. Porcelain. 13" x 11" x 8.5"
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Alice Aycock. Maze. Photo documentation of destroyed piece.
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Posted February 22, 2005; Image additions: March 7, 2005