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On Exhibit at the Art Library: Finding Wonder outside and between Pages

January 23, 2018
Esther Lim exhibit image

In this installation opening February 16, Esther Lim will explore landscapes that informed the work of great children’s authors from the United Kingdom, transforming areas of the Art Library in the process.

Finding Wonder outside and between Pages, a mixed media installation by Esther Lim, will be on display at the Rutgers Art Library from February 16 to March 31, 2018.

Children’s authors are tasked with the burdensome responsibility of creating entire universes that are magical but also resonate with children. With the turn of the 19th century, worlds of fantasy and magic began to flow from the pens and paintbrushes of pioneers like Lewis Carroll, a mathematician, and Beatrix Potter, a botanist, who brought their diverse backgrounds and experiences into their places of make-believe. Settings such as the 100 Acre Woods, Wonderland, the Chocolate Factory, and Hogwarts are places so rich that they themselves become characters in their respective stories.

In this installation, Lim, who is a recent graduate of the Department of Landscape Architecture at Rutgers, will explore landscapes that informed the work of great children’s authors from the United Kingdom, looking at what sensory elements were translated into ink and paper and transforming areas of the Art Library in the process. She will draw extensively on her experience as winner of a 2017 DeBoer Travel Prize in Landscape Architecture, which allowed her to visit the inspirations behind these iconic literary places:

  • Ashdown Forest, England for A.A. Milne’s Tales of Winnie the Pooh
  • Oxford, England for Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  • Rostrevor, County Down, Ireland for C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia
  • Edinburgh, Scotland for J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series and J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan
  • Near Sawrey, Lake District, England for Beatrix Potter’s Tale of Peter Rabbit
  • Moseley Bog, Birmingham, England for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit