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"Stolen Art and History": 33rd Bishop Lecture at Alexander Library on March 13

February 25, 2019
Bishop Lecture flyer

"Stolen Art and History: A Curator Uncovers Theft from the Edward Hopper Estate" will be presented at Alexander Library on March 13.

Gail Levin

Gail Levin is Distinguished Professor of art history, American studies, and women’s studies at The Graduate Center and Baruch College of the City University of New York and a Rutgers alumna.

Gail Levin will present the 33rd annual Louis Faugères Bishop III lecture, “Stolen Art and History: A Curator Uncovers Theft from the Edward Hopper Estate,” on Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. in the SCC Teleconference Lecture Hall on the fourth floor of Alexander Library.

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Gail Levin is Distinguished Professor of art history, American studies, and women’s studies at The Graduate Center and Baruch College of the City University of New York and a Rutgers alumna. Levin is the acknowledged authority on the American painter Edward Hopper, having authored his catalogue raisonné, a monumental biography, and many other books and articles on this beloved American realist. Her lecture focuses on her discovery of a major theft from the Hopper estate before it reached the Whitney Museum, where she formerly served as curator of the Hopper Collection.

Her scholarship has also focused on Jewish artists, from Aaron Copland to Sonia Delaunay to feminists like Miriam Schapiro and Judy Chicago, the subject of her second biography. Her 1971 interview with Lee Krasner, conducted as part of her dissertation research, will be published in an exhibition catalog in London this spring, along with the first British edition of her 2011 biography of Krasner. In 2013, she organized a book, exhibition, and website, Theresa Bernstein: A Century in Art, featuring the supercentenarian (1890–2002). The recipient of a 1996 honorary doctorate from her alma mater Simmons College, Levin’s work has been recognized by many grants, including from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Association, the Getty Research Institute, and Brandeis, Harvard, and Yale Universities. Levin is currently the Leon Levy Senior Scholar at the Center for the History of Collecting at the Frick Art Reference Library.

Gail Levin has a longstanding connection with Rutgers. In 1976, she was granted the first Ph.D. conferred by the new program in art history. In 2007, she received a Rutgers Distinguished Alumni/ae award for distinction in the humanities.