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Celebrating the Centennial of Douglass

February 9, 2018
Weepies

Established by two ukulele players from the Class of 1922, The Weepies, or the Weeping Willows, as they were originally known because of the members’ height, was an octet that sang in three- and four-part harmonies and performed at campus events.

Marking the centennial of Douglass is a very special occasion for the university, especially so for Rutgers University Libraries. The Mabel Smith Douglass Library, named after the first dean of the New Jersey College for Women, houses the women’s studies, music, and performing arts collections.

Douglass Residential College, formerly Douglass College, was founded in 1918 as the New Jersey College for Women. Throughout its history, the college has been an intellectual community for undergraduate women that inspires its students to learn, lead, and live with conviction, creativity, and critical insight.

In celebration of this milestone, the Libraries’ Kayo Denda, Erika Gorder, and Fernanda Perrone have curated The Creative Life of Douglass, an exhibition that chronicles ten decades of dance, theater, music, visual arts, and creative writing produced by women at Douglass through archival photographs, objects, books, and video from the University Archives and other collections.

The exhibition will be on view through April 6 in the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series Galleries at Douglass Library. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. and are subject to the library’s operating schedule.

There will be a panel discussion at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 28 in the Mabel Smith Douglass Room. The discussion will bring together past Douglass students, and past and current faculty who will share their experiences and knowledge of the many arts programs and opportunities that enriched campus life.

The Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series is a program of Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities in partnership with Rutgers University Libraries. It was founded in 1971 by Douglass graduate and artist Joan Snyder DC ’62 under the leadership of Library Director, Daisy Brightenback Shenholm DC '44.